Sunday, September 17, 2017

Elsinore Ward

This beautiful chapel is in the small town of Elsinore, just south of Richfield in Southern Utah. Built in 1911, it has since been sold and is now privately owned.

(Image Source: Church History Library) 

The building itself appears to be in fairly good shape.


Friday, September 15, 2017

Preservation Update: St. George Tabernacle Struck by Lightning

Yesterday, the St. George Tabernacle (which is currently being renovated) was struck by lightning, causing a small fire in the attic.
Lightning reportedly struck the St. George Tabernacle
(Image Source)









The timing was extremely fortunate. Construction workers and nearby pedestrians immediately reported the fire, and because of the building's thick and historic wood, the fire didn't spread very far. You can read more about the incident here:

http://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2017/09/14/st-george-tabernacle-catches-fire-after-lightning-strike/666669001/

http://gephardtdaily.com/local/historic-lds-tabernacle-in-st-george-struck-by-lightning-scarred-by-fire/

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Panguitch South Ward

Panguitch is one of the oldest settlements of the Mormon corridor, but almost none of its original ecclesiastical architecture survives today. One of its most notable buildings was its stake tabernacle, which stood on the corner of 100 E and Center.

(Image Source: Church History Library)

The tabernacle was condemned and torn down in 1949; a grassy lawn was left in its place for many decades. Now, stores are in its place, but a marker remains.



Meanwhile, in 1930, Panguitch's two wards (the north ward and the south ward) both had chapels built. The Panguitch North Ward chapel (located right by the tabernacle) has since been torn down.

(Image Source: Church History Library)

This building was torn down sometime around 1980, I believe.

This only leaves the pioneer town with one old chapel--the Panguitch South Ward.

(Image Source: Church History Library)

You'll notice it looks almost identical to the Panguitch North Ward, but this building has survived. An old photo provides a glimpse of the interior--very simple.

(Image Source: Church History Library)

This building technically still stands today, but it's in rough shape. It was sold to a Baptist church--likely around the same time the North Ward was torn down--but it doesn't appear to be in active use today.



It really is a pity that such an old pioneer town is left with almost none of its historic religious architecture. Hopefully this building will continue to be used.


Sunday, September 3, 2017

Grandview (Provo) Ward

The Grandview Ward (in Provo) built their meetinghouse in 1923. It's a small but charming brick chapel.


I'm not sure when the building was sold--probably in the 1960s or 1970s--but it now houses a baptist church. The building itself has been changed very little.


Sunday, August 27, 2017

American Fork Second Ward: Exterior Details

This chapel could definitely use some work. The main concern is the appearance of the roof, some missing finials, and some problems in the brickwork.





Sunday, August 20, 2017

American Fork Second Ward: Stained Glass Details

This building still has some beautiful Victorian stained glass windows. They are both transom windows, and both in the original chapel portion of the building.


Nobody was there when I visited the building, so I couldn't ask for an interior view. I was able to get a view by looking in adjacent windows, so you'll notice it's lower quality.





Sunday, August 13, 2017

American Fork Second Ward

The American Fork Second Ward Meetinghouse was built largely in 1903; by the end of January 1904, the ward was able to meet inside the building.

(Image Source: Church History Library)


Fortunately, the building has been very well preserved. The chapel on the right (with the corner steeple, which acted as an entrance) is the original portion of the building; the rest was added on in 1929. Fortunately, the addition matches the architecture of the original portion exactly.


The building has some beautiful details--colorful stained glass, unique finials, and beautiful brick work all add to the building's character. The Church vacated the building in 1979; in 1984, Bigelow and Co., an organ building company, purchased the building. They still own it today.